Like Ne-Yo, like Pharrell, like Michael Jackson and Prince before them, the superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae) matches song and dance in an elaborate display that gets the ladies all hot and bothered. Australian researchers found that male birds prepared and delivered four different songs each with corresponding dance moves as part of their mating ritual. See a video of the dance (and read some pretty cheeky quotes from the study authors) on sci-news.com. Or check out the science-y article in Current Biology. 

«Original photo  by tristrambrelstaff (contact)»

Like Ne-Yo, like Pharrell, like Michael Jackson and Prince before them, the superb lyrebird (Menura novaehollandiae) matches song and dance in an elaborate display that gets the ladies all hot and bothered. Australian researchers found that male birds prepared and delivered four different songs each with corresponding dance moves as part of their mating ritual. See a video of the dance (and read some pretty cheeky quotes from the study authors) on sci-news.com. Or check out the science-y article in Current Biology.

«Original photo by tristrambrelstaff (contact


Men At Work-Land Down Under by adiis

Hey Girl, Anthrozoologist Real Gosling is excited to announce that it’s author is interning with the Anthrozoology Research Group for the next four weeks (probably got the gig because we share an acronym). She’ll be bringing her brand of sarcasm to the ARG Facebook page, assisting with research, writing for their website and watching the video above on loop. See ya in 4!

Apes: they’re just like us! Research conducted by Rosati & Hare (2013) on the emotional response of bonobos and chimps found that these primates routinely display negative affect (a.k.a. emotion) in response to a “bad decision” (you know, like that last beer). In the study, the apes pouted, whimpered, screamed and banged with their fists when they took a gamble that didn’t pay off (you know, like the slot machines at the Vegas airport). 
There’s a lot more profound and fascinating stuff to this study and its implications. You should read the full text in PLOS ONE. Or at least skim this Discovery.com article.

«original photo»

Apes: they’re just like us! Research conducted by Rosati & Hare (2013) on the emotional response of bonobos and chimps found that these primates routinely display negative affect (a.k.a. emotion) in response to a “bad decision” (you know, like that last beer). In the study, the apes pouted, whimpered, screamed and banged with their fists when they took a gamble that didn’t pay off (you know, like the slot machines at the Vegas airport).


There’s a lot more profound and fascinating stuff to this study and its implications. You should read the full text in PLOS ONE. Or at least skim this Discovery.com article.

«original photo»

asker

oceansrealm asked: Sand tiger sharks (Carcharias taurus) not tiger sharks.. :-S

I corrected it. Thanks for the copy edit! :)

Girl. Sand tiger shark embryos is CRAY-CRAY! It’s really all a matter of defending dad. You see, Mama Shark mates with loads of Daddy Sharks and, thus, has quite the mishmashed litter growing on. But then the biggest, baddest embryo is all like, “My dad is better than your dad.” And then he eats all the half siblings so that only one or two of his dad’s kids (and maybe just him) make it to the end of the pregnancy. NOM NOM NOM. 
Don’t believe me? Read all about it in Biology Letters. Seriously, there’s a free full-text PDF and everything, girl.

«original photo»

Girl. Sand tiger shark embryos is CRAY-CRAY! It’s really all a matter of defending dad. You see, Mama Shark mates with loads of Daddy Sharks and, thus, has quite the mishmashed litter growing on. But then the biggest, baddest embryo is all like, “My dad is better than your dad.” And then he eats all the half siblings so that only one or two of his dad’s kids (and maybe just him) make it to the end of the pregnancy. NOM NOM NOM.

Don’t believe me? Read all about it in Biology Letters. Seriously, there’s a free full-text PDF and everything, girl.

«original photo»

Move over cute, full-of-energy, 20-something parents. The wandering albatross (Diomeda exulans) has given mid-life ‘rents something to sing about. A recent study in Ecology Letters explores the success that this species has rearing a final chick. Certainly, these birds (who mate for life, BTW) effectively rear chicks in their early days, but a longitudinal study of the wandering albatross illuminated an unusual turn of events: a high rate of success raising the last kiddo, too. Feel free to read more about how older parents are awesome (well, older albatross parents anyway) in this article from the NY Times.


«original photo»

Move over cute, full-of-energy, 20-something parents. The wandering albatross (Diomeda exulans) has given mid-life ‘rents something to sing about. A recent study in Ecology Letters explores the success that this species has rearing a final chick. Certainly, these birds (who mate for life, BTW) effectively rear chicks in their early days, but a longitudinal study of the wandering albatross illuminated an unusual turn of events: a high rate of success raising the last kiddo, too. Feel free to read more about how older parents are awesome (well, older albatross parents anyway) in this article from the NY Times.

«original photo»

A giggly mouse with the munchies is having a laugh at the WPD after allegedly stealing marijuana from the police station’s evidence storage facility. The Kansas cops, who apparently have a sense of humor themselves, created a sketch of the culprit, held a press conference, and were subsequently featured on Anderson Cooper 360.

But this is no laughing matter! Studies show that weed “impairs the retrieval of recent memory independently of its effects on initial learning, sensorimotor performance, or motivation” in mice. Yep, there have been actual, real, scientific research into the matter. One can only hope the mouse remembered his way back home. Or at least to the 7-11.

Stuck on the ice, eh? Don’t worthy, eh, the human populous of Dartmouth is at your attention!
Yup, when folks saw a goose stuck on a frozen Nova Scotian pond, “calls came flooding in” to the Hope for Wildlife Society, where the bird is now recovering. According to an article by CVT Atlantic News, the freezin’ fella was having a tough time managing the ice-covered landscape and was weak from the cold. The bird is now warming up nicely at the society until the temps rise and s/he is OK’d to head back to the pond. Lesson? Humans and wildlife can get along — and it only takes a wee bit of effort, eh. 
«original photo»

Stuck on the ice, eh? Don’t worthy, eh, the human populous of Dartmouth is at your attention!

Yup, when folks saw a goose stuck on a frozen Nova Scotian pond, “calls came flooding in” to the Hope for Wildlife Society, where the bird is now recovering. According to an article by CVT Atlantic News, the freezin’ fella was having a tough time managing the ice-covered landscape and was weak from the cold. The bird is now warming up nicely at the society until the temps rise and s/he is OK’d to head back to the pond. Lesson? Humans and wildlife can get along — and it only takes a wee bit of effort, eh.

«original photo»

Hey Girl. The new year is approaching, which we all know means it’s time to reflect, relax and re-gift. Thanks for joining Anthrozoologist Real Gosling as we began our snarky science journey earlier this year. Can’t wait to see what 2013 brings (assuming the world doesn’t end later today, per the Mayans).
XOXO - the RG

Hey Girl. The new year is approaching, which we all know means it’s time to reflect, relax and re-gift. Thanks for joining Anthrozoologist Real Gosling as we began our snarky science journey earlier this year. Can’t wait to see what 2013 brings (assuming the world doesn’t end later today, per the Mayans).

XOXO - the RG


“It’s a wonder that man can eat at all, when things are big that should be small. Who can tell what magic spells we’ll be doing for us?” 

A couple of Jamiroquai lyrics from a ’90s single suddenly feel real. That’s because brand-spankin’-new virtual reality technology has allowed researchers to “beam” a scaled-down version of a person into a rat facility. As a result, human-rat interaction can occur on the same scale. Mind you, the humans in this virtual reality science project are interacting on their end with a people-sized rat avatar. This crazy-awesome research, conducted jointly by computer scientists from UCLA and the University of Barcelona, creates an entirely new way for humans to interact with other animals. The possible uses of this virtual technology for studying animal behavior and human-animal interaction are, as they say, endless.

It’s a wonder that man can eat at all, when things are big that should be small. Who can tell what magic spells we’ll be doing for us?”

A couple of Jamiroquai lyrics from a ’90s single suddenly feel real. That’s because brand-spankin’-new virtual reality technology has allowed researchers to “beam” a scaled-down version of a person into a rat facility. As a result, human-rat interaction can occur on the same scale. Mind you, the humans in this virtual reality science project are interacting on their end with a people-sized rat avatar. This crazy-awesome research, conducted jointly by computer scientists from UCLA and the University of Barcelona, creates an entirely new way for humans to interact with other animals. The possible uses of this virtual technology for studying animal behavior and human-animal interaction are, as they say, endless.